The Roadster Factory
TR6 - TR250 Glove Box Companion
A B C D E F G H I-J K L M N-O P R S T U-V W-Z
LOGIN | VIEW CART | CHECKOUT
View Shopping Cart -
Search
                      10       < Previous Next >       10        
Page Map
Stock Front Sway Bars, TR250, TR6 Addco Sway Bars, TR250, TR6 - - Moto-lita Steering Wheels, TR250, TR6 Steering Wheel Center Pads, Later TR6 Steering Wheel Center Pad And Spoke Cover Kits, TR250 Steering Column Mounts And Bushes, TR250, TR6
Scroll to view page
TR250 and TR6 Companion
99
SUSPENSION
WIRE WHEELS, SPRINGS, AND TRAILING ARM
MOUNTINGS, TR5, TR250, TR6
"Information Shared from Our Experience Here at TRF"
Over the past couple of years, several cars have been built by Charles Runyan and
John Swauger with advice from Randy Phillippi, an accomplished mechanic, body man,
and car enthusiast who lives in our area and helps us with many of our projects.  The
first car built was John Swauger's 1970 TR6, the second was a 1976 TR6 built for
Charles's wife, and the third car was Charles's own TR5 whose details are almost
identical to the TR250.
There were some problems noted when the 1976 TR6 was put back on the road.
Some of these related to a bent trailing arm which was later replaced, and others related
to the fact that the rear suspension sat on the bump stops.  Eventually, it was
determined that this problem was caused by the use of commonly available rear springs
that are just too long and strong for the car.  It was then noticed that John Swauger's
1970 TR6 was suffering from the same phenomenon.
Care was taken not to recreate the same problem when building the TR5, and more
checks were made during the building phase.  An ideal ride height was determined, and
the upper and lower limits of suspension travel were simulated.  Up till that time, it
had been planned that six-inch wide Dayton wire wheels with 72-spokes would be used
along with redline tires.  When these were fitted up to the rear suspension with no
spring in position, it was determined that the tire could conceivably rub inside the rear
fender at the top of suspension travel, although it was probably unlikely.  Nevertheless,
several alternatives were explored, and it was decided to use five-inch wide wire wheels
with 72-spokes, as used on MGC models, along with the redline tires.
To get the suspension off the bump stops, the "lowered" competition springs (see
page 79) were fitted.  On the TR5, no spacer was fitted with the rear springs, but
half-inch spacers were used on the front to level the car front-to-rear once it was back on
its wheels.  To align rear wheels to specifications with this arrangement, it was
necessary to use the adjustable trailing arm mounting brackets listed on page 98.
Later, these same modifications were made to the 1976 TR6 and to the 1970 TR6,
including the use of the adjustable trailing arm brackets.  Spacers (see page 79) were
used with the springs on these cars to adjust ride height and to level the car front to
rear, but I think you will be able to get by with no spacers or with just 1/2-inch
spacers where they are needed.  The six-inch wide Dayton wire wheels with 72-spokes
were fine on the 1970 TR6, and the 1976 model has stock wheels with its original trim
rings and redline tires.  The parts discussed in this section are found in various locations
within this catalogue.
HP173 (showing
two stacked)

                      10       < Previous | | | | | | Next >       10        

This Zenscript (Print to E-Commerce) catalog conversion was performed by zeni.net internet services. If you have questions about this interface, contact support@zeni.net. Cookies and Javascript must be enabled for online ordering, but these pages should render in a viewable manner in any style-sheet capable browser.